Traditional Plant Cultivation on the Coast: Indigenous Estuary Root Gardens

Part of: Emerging Ecology Research Series

Course description

On the Northwest Coast, long before colonization, Indigenous peoples managed and modified coastal landscapes through practices such as proscribed burns, the creation of terraced gardens, and the management of individual plants or plant communities (such as weeding or pruning). In this short course, we will learn about various forms of traditional plant management, with a specific focus on estuary root gardens as a case study. We will also touch on how the dismissal of indigenous plant cultivation by early colonial arrivals and anthropologists has had an enduring impact on our understanding of subsistence practices on the Northwest Coast – and how we are just starting to rectify these mistakes.

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